National Dentist´s Day

Post by: Gerarda on 06 Mar 2020

March 6th every year we show appreciation to dentists all over the world who keep our pearly whites in tip top shape. This day is also a way to bring awareness to dentistry so that people can learn how best to care for their teeth. It is also a reminder for those who have neglected their teeth or avoid going to a dentist to schedule a checkup.

Nothing makes a dentist happier then when a patient arrives and it is obvious they have good oral hygiene as they brush and floss regularly.

What the patient can do:
1. Decide on an oral health routine. Include both brushing and flossing and remember to floss after you have brushed.
2. Book that dental checkup you have been putting off. Ask your dentist to show you have to brush your teeth so you are not wearing away enamel.
3. If you have children, brush their teeth until they are mature enough to do it for themselves. Once you have brushed your child´s teeth, give them the brush so they feel they are doing it as well.
4. Smile and show off those pearly whites. It shows the job you do and that of your dentist.
5. Take a picture of those beautiful teeth and post it on your social media accounts.

Tips for a healthy dental routine:
1. Brush at least twice a day for at least 2 minutes.
2. Brush gently using elliptical strokes.
3. Use a soft toothbrush.
4. Brush after eating.
5. Floss after brushing.
6. See your dentist twice a year or as your dentist recommends.
7. Eat a balanced diet and limit eating and drinking between meals.
8. Limit the amount of citrus you eat and drink.

A visit to a dentist is a scary proposition for many people. Remember though, dentistry has come a long way from when Dr. John M. Harris started the world’s first dental school in
Bainbridge, Ohio in 1828.

Evolving dental technology and education are two of the things that make a visit to a dentist much more pleasant than in earlier days. That being said nothing beats a dentist who has the hands of a sculptor, the precision of an engineer, the eye of an artist and the experience to combine all of these professions to carry out either a simple or a challenging treatment and still make the result look natural.

That is in essence Dr. Mikael G. Kahn or as he is so affectionately known, Mikael.

Categories: Uncategorized

Posted on Friday 6th March 2020 at 4:19 pm

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Post by: Gerarda on 27 Feb 2020

Overview

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) spreads when a sick person coughs or sneezes and droplets of their saliva gets into the eyes, nose or mouth of a healthy person. At times, sick person’s saliva can get on objects like a doorknob, pen, computer & mouse, phone, elevator buttons, tissues, stair railings. You get the picture.

If you see someone who is visibly sick and they are coughing or sneezing you can keep your distance from 1 – 2 meters. If you are sneezing or coughing yourself then either sneeze into your mask if you are wearing one or sneeze into your elbow. If you sneeze into a tissue remember to throw it away and not put it in your pocket or handbag.

If you touch objects like a doorknob or an elevator button or use someone´s pen, etc. then keep your hands off your eyes, nose and mouth. You could pick up germs left behind and when you come in contact with those you love you spread it to them as well.

It is not known how long the virus lasts; however, if it is anything like SARS and MERS, it can stay on metal, glass and plastic for several days. A regular flu virus lasts on objects about 48 hours. Use disinfectants to wash away items that an infected person has come in contact with. Wash your hand for at least 20 seconds with soap and water for hand hygiene.

As there is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus (COVID-19) the best way to prevent becoming sick is to avoid being exposed to it. The CDC recommends common everyday preventative measures to help the spread of respiratory diseases in general.

Prevention

As a general rule they include:
• Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
• Avoid crowds as you don´t know who is sick and who isn´t. People who are infected may show no symptoms, but still be contagious.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
• Stay home when you are sick.
• Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
• Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleanser.
• Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. Wash the back of your hand, between your fingers and under your nails.
• If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
These are common sense procedures to picking up germs, but if you look around any given time they are not practiced.

Facemask

• CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases, including COVID-19.
• Facemasks should be used by people who show symptoms of COVID-19 to help prevent the spread of the disease to others. The use of facemasks is also crucial for health workers and people who are taking care of someone in close settings (at home or in a health-care facility).

We can all do our part to help stop coronavirus (COVID-19) by knowing the symptoms to look for:

  • Fever
  • Dry cough
  • Shortness of breath

If you have traveled to an area known to have the coronavirus (COVID-19) in the past 14 days and do not feel well then call your doctor. CALL AHEAD! Do not, just show up at an emergency room or your doctor’s office before calling, as you run the risk of exposing others if you are sock. When you call, remember to let your doctor know where you have travelled and your symptoms. They will advise you what to do next.

Someone wearing a mask may not be sick, but only trying to protect themselves.

People who think they may have been exposed to COVID-19 should contact their healthcare provider immediately.

This information is a combination of information from the Mayo Clinic and the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention).

Dental Appointment

Post by: Gerarda on 19 Feb 2020

What You Can Do To Prepare

Sometimes it seems that by the time you arrive at your dental appointment the problem has disappeared and then you have forgotten the symptoms you had. Most problems in dentistry do not go away permanently, the symptoms may stop for a while, but they usually come back. So it is beneficial to keep that appointment and not cancel it. To help you get ready for a dental appointment, make a list of:

• Any symptoms you’re experiencing, including any that may seem unrelated to the reason for your appointment
• Important personal information, such as any medical conditions
• Medications you take, including vitamins or other supplements
• Questions to ask your dentist to take full advantage of your time together

Some questions to ask your dentist depending on your issue may include:

• Do you think, for example, gingivitis, caries or an abscess is causing my symptoms?
• Do I need x-rays?
• Is there an alternative to the approach you’re recommending?
• What can I do at home to keep my gums and teeth healthy?
• Do you recommend a particular toothbrush or toothpaste?
• Do you recommend using mouthwash?
• Can I gargle with salt water or should I use a stronger antibacterial mouthwash?
• Are there any restrictions that you would suggest?

Don’t hesitate to ask other questions during your appointment.

Remember to make a note of your symptoms. Note when your symptoms come and go and how long they last. You might be stressed before a dental appointment and if you are in pain as well you might not remember all the things you want to ask. Write them down and take them with you to your appointment.

Dentures Concluded

Post by: Gerarda on 10 Feb 2020

Today´s blog, is part 6 of a 6-part series.

What type of denture is best for me?
You and your dentist will decide which type of denture is best for you, but your dental requirements may necessitate a particular type. An example of this is if you have all your teeth removed, then you would not be able to have a partial or an overdenture (removable dental prosthesis that covers and rests on one or more remaining natural teeth, the roots of natural teeth, and/or dental implants).

Only a dentist who is highly qualified in dentures can help you decide which type of denture is best for you.

Conclusion
Teeth are a significant component to retaining the shape of your face. Without the support of teeth the mouth collapses and one experiences sagging of the facial skin. Dentures provide your jaw the height to restore your face to its normal position. Whether you choose fixed or removable dentures it is important to know that there are many options available, traditional/full, partial, custom, immediate, snap-in, overdenture, upper, lower or economy to name a few.

Consult a dentist who is skilled in dentures and together decide the best option for you based on whether some or all of your teeth need to be replaced and the cost involved.

Alternatives to Dentures

Post by: Gerarda on 30 Jan 2020

Today´s blog, is part 5 of a 6-part series.

What are the alternatives to dentures?
One alternative is an implant supported denture which allows you to have a permanently fixed denture. This eliminates one of the concerns most people have about conventional full dentures, that they will lose the denture when eating or while out in public. Prior to the introduction of osseointegrated implants (when the implant has fully healed into the bone) a conventional complete removable denture was the only treatment option available for completely edentulous patients. A denture supported on implants or a bridge are alternatives.

An implant-supported denture uses between 4-6 implants in a jaw. The denture uses the strength of the dental implants to support and retain a full set of false teeth. The denture is fixed permanently in place and the pressure from eating is transmitted to the implants rather than the gums, therefore, you have the safety and security that it will not accidentally come out as your dentist is the only one who can take it out.

Another alternative to a denture is a bridge. A bridge replaces missing teeth by placing two or more specially fitted crowns on either side of the space formed by your missing tooth or teeth. A false tooth or pontic is attached to fill in the space of the missing tooth or teeth. As bridges are cemented in place, they are considered a “fixed or permanent denture.”

What are the benefits of implants?
The obvious benefit of having an implant-supported denture is the security one feels that it will not come out unexpectedly. The denture is anchored firmly in place so is stable in the mouth. There is no discomfort from friction with the gum and they are more hygienic as there is less surface contact with the gums. They also allow you to eat normally and taste your food as there is no acrylic blocking your taste buds.