Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Post by: Gerarda on 27 Feb 2020

Overview

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) spreads when a sick person coughs or sneezes and droplets of their saliva gets into the eyes, nose or mouth of a healthy person. At times, sick person’s saliva can get on objects like a doorknob, pen, computer & mouse, phone, elevator buttons, tissues, stair railings. You get the picture.

If you see someone who is visibly sick and they are coughing or sneezing you can keep your distance from 1 – 2 meters. If you are sneezing or coughing yourself then either sneeze into your mask if you are wearing one or sneeze into your elbow. If you sneeze into a tissue remember to throw it away and not put it in your pocket or handbag.

If you touch objects like a doorknob or an elevator button or use someone´s pen, etc. then keep your hands off your eyes, nose and mouth. You could pick up germs left behind and when you come in contact with those you love you spread it to them as well.

It is not known how long the virus lasts; however, if it is anything like SARS and MERS, it can stay on metal, glass and plastic for several days. A regular flu virus lasts on objects about 48 hours. Use disinfectants to wash away items that an infected person has come in contact with. Wash your hand for at least 20 seconds with soap and water for hand hygiene.

As there is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus (COVID-19) the best way to prevent becoming sick is to avoid being exposed to it. The CDC recommends common everyday preventative measures to help the spread of respiratory diseases in general.

Prevention

As a general rule they include:
• Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
• Avoid crowds as you don´t know who is sick and who isn´t. People who are infected may show no symptoms, but still be contagious.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
• Stay home when you are sick.
• Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
• Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleanser.
• Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. Wash the back of your hand, between your fingers and under your nails.
• If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
These are common sense procedures to picking up germs, but if you look around any given time they are not practiced.

Facemask

• CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases, including COVID-19.
• Facemasks should be used by people who show symptoms of COVID-19 to help prevent the spread of the disease to others. The use of facemasks is also crucial for health workers and people who are taking care of someone in close settings (at home or in a health-care facility).

We can all do our part to help stop coronavirus (COVID-19) by knowing the symptoms to look for:

  • Fever
  • Dry cough
  • Shortness of breath

If you have traveled to an area known to have the coronavirus (COVID-19) in the past 14 days and do not feel well then call your doctor. CALL AHEAD! Do not, just show up at an emergency room or your doctor’s office before calling, as you run the risk of exposing others if you are sock. When you call, remember to let your doctor know where you have travelled and your symptoms. They will advise you what to do next.

Someone wearing a mask may not be sick, but only trying to protect themselves.

People who think they may have been exposed to COVID-19 should contact their healthcare provider immediately.

This information is a combination of information from the Mayo Clinic and the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention).

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