Flossing Tips

Post by: Gerarda on 05 Aug 2022

Proper flossing can help reduce the risk of gum disease and cavities, and is an important step toward having an overall healthy mouth. In fact, The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends flossing at least once a day in order to achieve optimal oral health.

Daily flossing removes plaque and bacteria from between the teeth — where a toothbrush can’t reach. If you are just learning to floss, you can experience minor discomfort. That usually comes from having the length of floss between your fingers too long and the floss either gets stuck and tears or you cut your gum. It’s important that you don’t stop flossing. If the discomfort doesn’t go away after a week or two of daily flossing, be sure to visit your dental office as soon as possible. Like everything, practice makes perfect.

Flossing Tips for Healthy Gums:

Floss after brushing your teeth
Glide the floss in between each tooth using a sawing motion
Angle the floss in a “c” shape around the tooth and slightly below the gumline
Repeat on each tooth
Unravel the floss from your fingers, supplying fresh floss for each tooth

There is debate on whether you should floss before or after brushing. We suggest that which ever you choose the important thing is that you actually do it.

Even if you do floss routinely and assuming you floss correctly, it’s still very important to have regular visits with your dentist. If you’re in need of a professional cleaning or check-up, or if you just want to show off your healthy gums, call to schedule an appointment today.

 

Categories: Dental appointment,Dental Check-up,Dental Information
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Posted on Friday 5th August 2022 at 12:56 pm

The Teeth & Kidney Connection

Post by: Gerarda on 15 Mar 2021

March is National Kidney Month, a time when people take part in activities to raise awareness about kidney disease. While this year’s focus is on “taking charge of your health and the many factors that go into managing your kidney disease”, my focus is on teeth and kidney disease.

Despite the fact that chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects 1.7 million people in Europe and 37 million people in America, it is often overlooked until symptoms appear. By that time it is usually very advanced. CKD is progressive and can put a person at risk for other serious health complications including heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, anemia, weak bones and of course kidney failure.

Although good dental care is important for everyone, it is especially so for people with kidney disease.

Cavities and gum disease are chronic bacterial infection. It is essential for everyone to have these treated, but even more so for someone with kidney disease. If left untreated oral bacteria and inflammation don’t stay in the mouth, but travel throughout the body, especially if you have a weak immune system. Chronic infections create continuous inflammation which is especially harmful to people with kidney disease.

Along with screening for all types of infections, even a dental check-up is required for any person being evaluated for a kidney transplant. That is how important infection and inflammation are to the transplant process. If problems are identified during the examination, the kidney transplant will be delayed or even cancelled depending on the severity of them.

It is important to remember what might start out being a minor infection for a healthy person could become a major problem for someone with kidney disease. Infections in the body that are normally helped by the body´s natural healing system of inflammation cause serious harm in CKD patients who have prolonged or chronic infection. Anti-rejection medication used after a transplant weakens the body´s defenses against infection.

If you have kidney disease, are on dialysis, have had a kidney transplant or in the screening process, it is important that you tell your dentist.