If You Only Brush Once a Day

Post by: Gerarda on 05 Jul 2022

Maintaining good oral hygiene takes among other things, regularly brushing your teeth. Tell me something I don´t know, you may say.

Dental associations around the world recommend brushing your teeth twice a day, for two minutes each time. That means brush after breakfast for two minutes and again at night for another two minutes. That is a whopping four minutes out of your day and yet not everyone follows this recommendation. More people than you might think actually go through the day only brushing once. While that is better than not brushing at all which is essentially 2% of the population, it actually increases your chances of incurring costly dental treatment later on.

Brushing your teeth twice a day as is suggested by dental professionals has a few advantages, it saves the embarrassment of having bad breath and stained teeth.

By brushing only once a day:

1. Cavities are almost a certainty and that increases your risk by 33%. When you brush your teeth, it helps to remove food particles and the sticky substance containing bacteria that forms on your teeth called plaque. This bacteria-containing plaque produces acid which attack tooth enamel and if not removed causes cavities.

2. Increases your chance of getting gum disease – only brushing once every 24 hours creates a feast for the existing bacteria in your mouth. The plaque that isn’t removed hardens and becomes tartar which makes it harder to keep the teeth clean. Tartar build-up on your gums leads to inflammation and bleeding gums that causes gum disease. This is also known as periodontal disease.

3. Can lead to more dental treatment. Needing a one-off filling is one thing and can happen to the best of us, but brushing only once a day almost guarantees more fillings and bigger fillings. Sometimes the tooth is decayed to the point of needing root canal treatment or a crown. Those costs can be avoided by adding another two minutes a day to your brushing routine.

One of the best ways to care for your teeth and gums is simple. Regular brushing. And that means twice a day. After meals.

Adding flossing to your routine is also beneficial, but that is for another day.

 

Where Art Meets Science

Post by: Gerarda on 30 May 2022

Where Art Meets Science

Dentistry, much like art, requires fingerspitzengefühl, a term taken from German, literally meaning “finger tips feeling” or intuitive flair or instinct. In today´s world of cosmetic dentistry it is the combination of fingerspitzengefühl along with skill, precision, intuition, architecture, engineering, medical science and artistry all working together in harmony to create not just a beautiful smile, but a functional smile.

Dentists learn the importance of the foundation of a healthy smile organically and through the advancement of imaging techniques such as periapical (also known as intraoral), panoramic, and cephalometric x-rays, a dentist can digitally capture images of your teeth and gums to evaluate your overall oral health to develop treatment plans for patients. There is however, much more that goes into a healthy, beautiful smile than a series of x-rays.

As dentists know the biology and physiology of the oral cavity and surrounding structure, it is not just through imaging, but also through observation and the clinical judgement of the dentist to make a diagnosis and plan of treatment. Photography and effective communication with patients to determine their expectations and what is actually possible also plays a vital role.

While science has propelled dentistry forward in the last 30 years it is that fingerspitzengefühl, that keen eye for detail, that eye for beauty, that instinct for the shape of teeth that corresponds with the age, skin colour, shape of lips, the proportion of teeth that show and the overall shape of the face of a patient that help determine the final result of any restoration, especially a smile make-over.

Having state of the art materials and equipment in the hands of a passionate dentist, with the right eye and fingerspitzengefühl, can only be a formula for success to achieve optimal balance between fit, appearance and function.

To Floss or Not To Floss

Post by: Gerarda on 23 Feb 2022

A common question we hear at Stockholm Dental is, “Do I really need to floss, or is brushing enough?” Unlike many things in life, flossing isn’t a mere suggestion; it’s actually an integral part of good oral hygiene, therefore, an indispensable part of your daily routine.

The purpose of flossing is to remove plaque and food particles from tight spaces between your teeth and hard to reach places. Flossing helps to keep your gums protected from bacteria which can cause periodontal disease. Flossing also keeps your teeth free of decay and your smile white.

The purpose of daily flossing is not only to promote healthy teeth, it further contributes to your health in other ways. There is increasing evidence linking periodontal disease to an increased risk of heart disease and an increase of inflammatory substances in the blood. (See blog post Jan 11, 2022)

Teeth brushing alone may not protect you from gum disease and subsequent tooth loss in extreme cases; however, adding flossing to your daily routine helps improve the health of your gums which in turn prevents gums from bleeding and feeding bacteria which causes tooth decay.

The American Dental Association has recommended flossing since 1908 and that recommendation hasn’t changed. Make the most of your oral care routine.

Don’t skip the flossing.

The Teeth & Kidney Connection

Post by: Gerarda on 15 Mar 2021

March is National Kidney Month, a time when people take part in activities to raise awareness about kidney disease. While this year’s focus is on “taking charge of your health and the many factors that go into managing your kidney disease”, my focus is on teeth and kidney disease.

Despite the fact that chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects 1.7 million people in Europe and 37 million people in America, it is often overlooked until symptoms appear. By that time it is usually very advanced. CKD is progressive and can put a person at risk for other serious health complications including heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, anemia, weak bones and of course kidney failure.

Although good dental care is important for everyone, it is especially so for people with kidney disease.

Cavities and gum disease are chronic bacterial infection. It is essential for everyone to have these treated, but even more so for someone with kidney disease. If left untreated oral bacteria and inflammation don’t stay in the mouth, but travel throughout the body, especially if you have a weak immune system. Chronic infections create continuous inflammation which is especially harmful to people with kidney disease.

Along with screening for all types of infections, even a dental check-up is required for any person being evaluated for a kidney transplant. That is how important infection and inflammation are to the transplant process. If problems are identified during the examination, the kidney transplant will be delayed or even cancelled depending on the severity of them.

It is important to remember what might start out being a minor infection for a healthy person could become a major problem for someone with kidney disease. Infections in the body that are normally helped by the body´s natural healing system of inflammation cause serious harm in CKD patients who have prolonged or chronic infection. Anti-rejection medication used after a transplant weakens the body´s defenses against infection.

If you have kidney disease, are on dialysis, have had a kidney transplant or in the screening process, it is important that you tell your dentist.

The Bitter Truth of Lemons

Post by: Gerarda on 10 Mar 2021

The biggest delinquent in tooth erosion (loss of tooth enamel) is acidic drinks. People are constantly being told that drinking the juice of a lemon the first thing in the morning is a great detox for the liver or the gastrointestinal tract. What you are not told is the fact that lemon is a highly acidic food. While lemon might be good for your digestive system and a good source for Vitamin C it is not good for your teeth.

If you must drink lemon juice, drink it with 250ml of warm water (not hot) to lessen the acidity. After drinking the lemon water, rinse your mouth with water immediately. This removes any acid that may remain on the tooth surface and reduces the acidity of your saliva.

DO NOT brush your teeth for at least 30 minutes after drinking the lemon water.

Use a soft toothbrush with a fluoride toothpaste (fluoride strengthens tooth enamel) and brush gently. The acid in the juice softens tooth enamel and makes it more prone to erosion during brushing.