What to Expect From a Dental Appointment

Post by: Gerarda on 15 Oct 2020

When you visit a dentist for the first time for an examination (check-up) or if you have an appointment for a specific problem, the dentist will ask you various questions about your symptoms. Some include:

• What is the problem?
• How long have you had the symptoms?
• Have your symptoms been constant or sporadic?
• How often do you brush your teeth?
• Do you brush before breakfast or after?
• Do you use dental floss? How often?
• How often do you visit a dentist?
• What if any medical conditions do you have?
• Has your health changed over the last year?
• What medications do you take? Take a list with dosages.

Make notes if you have sporadic symptoms as sometimes we think we will remember how we felt, but over time we forget. It is important for the dentist to know under which circumstances you have pain.

If you have pain on the day of your appointment try not to take a pain reliever too close to your appointment as it can mask your symptoms. Sometimes the pain is so unbearable though that you need to take something. If that is the case by all means do so. With pain on that level the dentist will diagnose the problem anyway.

Remember a visit to the dentist is not something to fear. The dentist and hygienist are there to help and make your visit as pleasant as possible.

Take control of your oral health by scheduling regular appointments for a check-up and clean.

 

 

Halitosis – Bad Breath

Post by: Gerarda on 20 Jul 2020

Overview

Depending on the condition of your health, various foods you eat, and level of oral hygiene, you can suffer from halitosis or bad breath. This condition can be embarrassing especially when it is particularly foul smelling. You don´t want to be in the position where someone smells your breath before they are close to you. Embarrassing indeed! Sometimes simply improving your oral hygiene and being consistent with it can improve the problem.

Sure there are countless products that are designed to fight bad breath, such as mouthwash, mints and gum, but they are only a temporary solution and don´t address the cause of the problem.

Things to do before you see your dentist:
• Brush after eating
• Brush your tongue
• Floss after brushing
• Drink plenty of water
• If that doesn’t work then make an appointment to see your dentist
• If your dentist decides that your teeth are not causing the bad breath, then make an appointment with your medical doctor to ensure it is not something more serious

Symptoms

There are those who worry too much about their breath and have no problem and those who have bad breath and don´t know it. A simple test is to blow your breath into a cupped hand and smell it or ask someone close to you to smell your breath. You better know this person well because it is not the nicest request.

When To See A Doctor

If you realize you have bad breath, then look at your oral hygiene. See what you need to change in your lifestyle. Maybe you need to brush your teeth if you don´t already, or maybe you need to brush more often.

Look at when you brush your teeth. If you brush them before breakfast and before you go to bed at night then you need to change your routine and brush after breakfast. If you only brush before breakfast then particles of food sit in the mouth and between teeth until you brush and floss again. Bacteria are feeding between brushing and that is when things happen. Sulfur is produced by food particles left in the mouth and then you end up with bad breath or halitosis.

If you have good oral hygiene and still have bad breath then see your medical doctor.

Making simple changes to your oral hygiene routine can make a big difference. It will also be cheaper on the wallet.

Dental Appointment

Post by: Gerarda on 19 Feb 2020

What You Can Do To Prepare

Sometimes it seems that by the time you arrive at your dental appointment the problem has disappeared and then you have forgotten the symptoms you had. Most problems in dentistry do not go away permanently, the symptoms may stop for a while, but they usually come back. So it is beneficial to keep that appointment and not cancel it. To help you get ready for a dental appointment, make a list of:

• Any symptoms you’re experiencing, including any that may seem unrelated to the reason for your appointment
• Important personal information, such as any medical conditions
• Medications you take, including vitamins or other supplements
• Questions to ask your dentist to take full advantage of your time together

Some questions to ask your dentist depending on your issue may include:

• Do you think, for example, gingivitis, caries or an abscess is causing my symptoms?
• Do I need x-rays?
• Is there an alternative to the approach you’re recommending?
• What can I do at home to keep my gums and teeth healthy?
• Do you recommend a particular toothbrush or toothpaste?
• Do you recommend using mouthwash?
• Can I gargle with salt water or should I use a stronger antibacterial mouthwash?
• Are there any restrictions that you would suggest?

Don’t hesitate to ask other questions during your appointment.

Remember to make a note of your symptoms. Note when your symptoms come and go and how long they last. You might be stressed before a dental appointment and if you are in pain as well you might not remember all the things you want to ask. Write them down and take them with you to your appointment.

Dentures Concluded

Post by: Gerarda on 10 Feb 2020

Today´s blog, is part 6 of a 6-part series.

What type of denture is best for me?
You and your dentist will decide which type of denture is best for you, but your dental requirements may necessitate a particular type. An example of this is if you have all your teeth removed, then you would not be able to have a partial or an overdenture (removable dental prosthesis that covers and rests on one or more remaining natural teeth, the roots of natural teeth, and/or dental implants).

Only a dentist who is highly qualified in dentures can help you decide which type of denture is best for you.

Conclusion
Teeth are a significant component to retaining the shape of your face. Without the support of teeth the mouth collapses and one experiences sagging of the facial skin. Dentures provide your jaw the height to restore your face to its normal position. Whether you choose fixed or removable dentures it is important to know that there are many options available, traditional/full, partial, custom, immediate, snap-in, overdenture, upper, lower or economy to name a few.

Consult a dentist who is skilled in dentures and together decide the best option for you based on whether some or all of your teeth need to be replaced and the cost involved.

Alternatives to Dentures

Post by: Gerarda on 30 Jan 2020

Today´s blog, is part 5 of a 6-part series.

What are the alternatives to dentures?
One alternative is an implant supported denture which allows you to have a permanently fixed denture. This eliminates one of the concerns most people have about conventional full dentures, that they will lose the denture when eating or while out in public. Prior to the introduction of osseointegrated implants (when the implant has fully healed into the bone) a conventional complete removable denture was the only treatment option available for completely edentulous patients. A denture supported on implants or a bridge are alternatives.

An implant-supported denture uses between 4-6 implants in a jaw. The denture uses the strength of the dental implants to support and retain a full set of false teeth. The denture is fixed permanently in place and the pressure from eating is transmitted to the implants rather than the gums, therefore, you have the safety and security that it will not accidentally come out as your dentist is the only one who can take it out.

Another alternative to a denture is a bridge. A bridge replaces missing teeth by placing two or more specially fitted crowns on either side of the space formed by your missing tooth or teeth. A false tooth or pontic is attached to fill in the space of the missing tooth or teeth. As bridges are cemented in place, they are considered a “fixed or permanent denture.”

What are the benefits of implants?
The obvious benefit of having an implant-supported denture is the security one feels that it will not come out unexpectedly. The denture is anchored firmly in place so is stable in the mouth. There is no discomfort from friction with the gum and they are more hygienic as there is less surface contact with the gums. They also allow you to eat normally and taste your food as there is no acrylic blocking your taste buds.