Dentures Concluded

Post by: Gerarda on 10 Feb 2020

Today´s blog, is part 6 of a 6-part series.

What type of denture is best for me?
You and your dentist will decide which type of denture is best for you, but your dental requirements may necessitate a particular type. An example of this is if you have all your teeth removed, then you would not be able to have a partial or an overdenture (removable dental prosthesis that covers and rests on one or more remaining natural teeth, the roots of natural teeth, and/or dental implants).

Only a dentist who is highly qualified in dentures can help you decide which type of denture is best for you.

Conclusion
Teeth are a significant component to retaining the shape of your face. Without the support of teeth the mouth collapses and one experiences sagging of the facial skin. Dentures provide your jaw the height to restore your face to its normal position. Whether you choose fixed or removable dentures it is important to know that there are many options available, traditional/full, partial, custom, immediate, snap-in, overdenture, upper, lower or economy to name a few.

Consult a dentist who is skilled in dentures and together decide the best option for you based on whether some or all of your teeth need to be replaced and the cost involved.

Alternatives to Dentures

Post by: Gerarda on 30 Jan 2020

Today´s blog, is part 5 of a 6-part series.

What are the alternatives to dentures?
One alternative is an implant supported denture which allows you to have a permanently fixed denture. This eliminates one of the concerns most people have about conventional full dentures, that they will lose the denture when eating or while out in public. Prior to the introduction of osseointegrated implants (when the implant has fully healed into the bone) a conventional complete removable denture was the only treatment option available for completely edentulous patients. A denture supported on implants or a bridge are alternatives.

An implant-supported denture uses between 4-6 implants in a jaw. The denture uses the strength of the dental implants to support and retain a full set of false teeth. The denture is fixed permanently in place and the pressure from eating is transmitted to the implants rather than the gums, therefore, you have the safety and security that it will not accidentally come out as your dentist is the only one who can take it out.

Another alternative to a denture is a bridge. A bridge replaces missing teeth by placing two or more specially fitted crowns on either side of the space formed by your missing tooth or teeth. A false tooth or pontic is attached to fill in the space of the missing tooth or teeth. As bridges are cemented in place, they are considered a “fixed or permanent denture.”

What are the benefits of implants?
The obvious benefit of having an implant-supported denture is the security one feels that it will not come out unexpectedly. The denture is anchored firmly in place so is stable in the mouth. There is no discomfort from friction with the gum and they are more hygienic as there is less surface contact with the gums. They also allow you to eat normally and taste your food as there is no acrylic blocking your taste buds.

 

Caring for your New Denture

Post by: Gerarda on 13 Jan 2020

Today´s blog, is part 4 of a 6-part series.

How do I care for my new denture?
Dentures should be handled with great care and when not in use, should be placed in a container of water or denture cleaner. Never put them in hot water as they can become damaged and not fit properly. Clean them daily with soap and water and a soft toothbrush. When you have taken your denture out, rinse your mouth to clean it of any plaque that may have accumulated from eating and drinking. Do this daily to reduce the risk of any infection. You can also use a denture cleaning product sold at pharmacies.

How long can I expect my dentures to last?
Dentures should last a minimum of 5 years having been properly cared for. It can vary from patient to patient and depending on if you have had regular visits to your dentist to ensure the denture continues to fit well. Over time, the bone shrinks and causes the denture to become loose. A denture that has become loose is a recipe for faster bone loss. To prevent this bone loss from happening, the dentist will reline the ill-fitting denture so that it conforms to the oral tissue.

If you have fractured a tooth, lost a tooth or fractured the base of the denture it can be repaired by a dental lab within 1 to 2 days. It is important to contact your dentist for this as a DIY job while it will be cheap, will not allow you a perfect repair job or an adjustment of the bite.

Will dental insurance cover the cost of dentures?
Some insurances will cover the cost of dentures or at least pay a part of the cost. You would need to contact your insurance company to see how much they would cover as it varies from company to company.

If you are from Ireland you can use the cost as an expense to offset your income tax. You would fill out a Med 2 form and submit it along with your income tax. Swedes under some instances can claim their dental treatment from Skatteverket if they have proper documentation. Let your dentist know in advance of any treatment if you are going to send a claim to your tax office or insurance company as they will need very particular documentation including, but not limited to photos and X-rays before and after the procedure. By letting your dentist know in advance s/he can begin the necessary documentation from your first appointment.

Categories: Dental health,Dental Information,Dentures,Puerto Banus News,Stockholm Dental Clinic News

Posted on Monday 13th January 2020 at 11:00 am

Practicalities of Denture Wearing

Post by: Gerarda on 08 Jan 2020

Today´s blog, part 3 of a 6-part series.

How is the denture held in the mouth?
The denture is held in the mouth by creating a seal with the roof of the mouth. Otherwise, a denture adhesive, denture glue or denture cream can be used to help keep the denture in place. A small amount of denture adhesive is applied to the denture to help improve the retention and stability instead of depending on suction or metal clasps. This also provides an extra sense of security especially if you are new to wearing dentures.

Denture adhesive is not meant to be a substitute for a poor-fitting denture or as an alternative to visiting your dentist.

As we are all individuals it stands to reason that each mouth is also individual, therefore, each denture is custom-made.

How will dentures affect the way I eat and drink?
While eating and drinking require practice it will be best to start with soft foods like pasta, fish and rice. Eat on both sides of your mouth and slowly introduce more solid foods as you feel more confident. Avoid eating sticky or chewy foods. Over time the tongue and cheeks will get used to the denture and will automatically be engaged in keeping the denture in place. The quicker you start introducing more solid food the faster you will forget about the denture as it will become a part of you.

Will I ever get used to speaking with my new denture?
1. Practice. Practice. Practice. It will require active practice on your part, but it will become easier the more you practice. Begin by saying words out loud that start with the letters F, S and Th.

2. Practice in front of a mirror – Look at where your tongue, lips and denture are and make necessary adjustments. You know how something should sound so you will be able to adjust accordingly.

3. Practice reading aloud – Whether it is your favorite book, a piece of poetry or a tongue twister practice reading out loud so you build confidence in speaking outside your family circle.

It is like anything new you get, it is important to practice!

Conventional Full Denture & Immediate Denture

Post by: Gerarda on 12 Nov 2019

Today´s blog, part 2 of a 6-part series.

Conventional Full Denture 
If you are edentulous (completely without teeth) then you would be a candidate for a conventional full denture. Once the teeth have been removed and the gums have healed, typically between 2-4 months, a conventional denture can be made.

Your dentist will begin the process of a conventional denture by taking a series of impressions of the oral tissue that will support the denture. The dental lab will make models of the patient´s mouth based on the impressions. Between the dental lab and the dentist they will slowly build a denture or a set of dentures that will fit your mouth and your mouth only. All of the impressions will go toward building a set of dentures that have a perfect fit. They will be sized to fit the shape of your face and mouth and the color will be in keeping with your complexion and age. A good bite will be established to ensure they are not only esthetically pleasing, but also functional.

This process usually takes about 5 weeks from start to finish and begins after all the healing has taken place and the tissue and bone has been remodeled. Once the patient starts to wear the denture and get used to them, they will most likely notice that further tweaking is needed to make them more comfortable as the gums can be sore in places. That is something that can be done chairside. Remember adjustments to the denture are an important part of the process and it is important to do those adjustments sooner rather than later as otherwise it will continue to irritate the oral tissue.

I can´t be without teeth. What do I do?
While you are waiting for the bone to remodel and gums to heal you would receive an immediate denture so that you have something to wear the same day the teeth are extracted. This type of denture is made before the teeth are extracted and fitted immediately after.

It won´t fit the bone and gum tissue as well as a conventional denture as the tissue is continually healing, therefore, it will require adjustments throughout the healing process.

It is important to remember that an immediate denture is a temporary appliance until the conventional denture can be made. That is made after all the healing and remodeling of the gum and bone has taken place.

When a person is missing teeth, s/he can experience a range of issues from the obvious ones of having difficulty eating and speaking to feelings of insecurity and ill-confidence because the face does not retain its shape. Without the support of teeth the mouth collapses and the lower portion of the face shrinks. A denture suddenly fills out the face as it provides your jaw the height to bring your face back to its normal shape.

Everything is new and can take some time to get used to. If you are new to dentures you may need to learn how to put the denture in and take it out. You may also need to learn how to speak, eat and drink. This too is part of the process.

Having an immediate denture solves two problems;  it helps restore a person’s appearance and gives the patient oral function at the same time. Hence its name, immediate denture.