Halitosis – Bad Breath

Post by: Gerarda on 20 Jul 2020

Overview

Depending on the condition of your health, various foods you eat, and level of oral hygiene, you can suffer from halitosis or bad breath. This condition can be embarrassing especially when it is particularly foul smelling. You don´t want to be in the position where someone smells your breath before they are close to you. Embarrassing indeed! Sometimes simply improving your oral hygiene and being consistent with it can improve the problem.

Sure there are countless products that are designed to fight bad breath, such as mouthwash, mints and gum, but they are only a temporary solution and don´t address the cause of the problem.

Things to do before you see your dentist:
• Brush after eating
• Brush your tongue
• Floss after brushing
• Drink plenty of water
• If that doesn’t work then make an appointment to see your dentist
• If your dentist decides that your teeth are not causing the bad breath, then make an appointment with your medical doctor to ensure it is not something more serious

Symptoms

There are those who worry too much about their breath and have no problem and those who have bad breath and don´t know it. A simple test is to blow your breath into a cupped hand and smell it or ask someone close to you to smell your breath. You better know this person well because it is not the nicest request.

When To See A Doctor

If you realize you have bad breath, then look at your oral hygiene. See what you need to change in your lifestyle. Maybe you need to brush your teeth if you don´t already, or maybe you need to brush more often.

Look at when you brush your teeth. If you brush them before breakfast and before you go to bed at night then you need to change your routine and brush after breakfast. If you only brush before breakfast then particles of food sit in the mouth and between teeth until you brush and floss again. Bacteria are feeding between brushing and that is when things happen. Sulfur is produced by food particles left in the mouth and then you end up with bad breath or halitosis.

If you have good oral hygiene and still have bad breath then see your medical doctor.

Making simple changes to your oral hygiene routine can make a big difference. It will also be cheaper on the wallet.

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Post by: Gerarda on 27 Feb 2020

Overview

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) spreads when a sick person coughs or sneezes and droplets of their saliva gets into the eyes, nose or mouth of a healthy person. At times, sick person’s saliva can get on objects like a doorknob, pen, computer & mouse, phone, elevator buttons, tissues, stair railings. You get the picture.

If you see someone who is visibly sick and they are coughing or sneezing you can keep your distance from 1 – 2 meters. If you are sneezing or coughing yourself then either sneeze into your mask if you are wearing one or sneeze into your elbow. If you sneeze into a tissue remember to throw it away and not put it in your pocket or handbag.

If you touch objects like a doorknob or an elevator button or use someone´s pen, etc. then keep your hands off your eyes, nose and mouth. You could pick up germs left behind and when you come in contact with those you love you spread it to them as well.

It is not known how long the virus lasts; however, if it is anything like SARS and MERS, it can stay on metal, glass and plastic for several days. A regular flu virus lasts on objects about 48 hours. Use disinfectants to wash away items that an infected person has come in contact with. Wash your hand for at least 20 seconds with soap and water for hand hygiene.

As there is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus (COVID-19) the best way to prevent becoming sick is to avoid being exposed to it. The CDC recommends common everyday preventative measures to help the spread of respiratory diseases in general.

Prevention

As a general rule they include:
• Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
• Avoid crowds as you don´t know who is sick and who isn´t. People who are infected may show no symptoms, but still be contagious.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
• Stay home when you are sick.
• Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
• Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleanser.
• Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. Wash the back of your hand, between your fingers and under your nails.
• If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
These are common sense procedures to picking up germs, but if you look around any given time they are not practiced.

Facemask

• CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases, including COVID-19.
• Facemasks should be used by people who show symptoms of COVID-19 to help prevent the spread of the disease to others. The use of facemasks is also crucial for health workers and people who are taking care of someone in close settings (at home or in a health-care facility).

We can all do our part to help stop coronavirus (COVID-19) by knowing the symptoms to look for:

  • Fever
  • Dry cough
  • Shortness of breath

If you have traveled to an area known to have the coronavirus (COVID-19) in the past 14 days and do not feel well then call your doctor. CALL AHEAD! Do not, just show up at an emergency room or your doctor’s office before calling, as you run the risk of exposing others if you are sock. When you call, remember to let your doctor know where you have travelled and your symptoms. They will advise you what to do next.

Someone wearing a mask may not be sick, but only trying to protect themselves.

People who think they may have been exposed to COVID-19 should contact their healthcare provider immediately.

This information is a combination of information from the Mayo Clinic and the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention).

Dental Appointment

Post by: Gerarda on 19 Feb 2020

What You Can Do To Prepare

Sometimes it seems that by the time you arrive at your dental appointment the problem has disappeared and then you have forgotten the symptoms you had. Most problems in dentistry do not go away permanently, the symptoms may stop for a while, but they usually come back. So it is beneficial to keep that appointment and not cancel it. To help you get ready for a dental appointment, make a list of:

• Any symptoms you’re experiencing, including any that may seem unrelated to the reason for your appointment
• Important personal information, such as any medical conditions
• Medications you take, including vitamins or other supplements
• Questions to ask your dentist to take full advantage of your time together

Some questions to ask your dentist depending on your issue may include:

• Do you think, for example, gingivitis, caries or an abscess is causing my symptoms?
• Do I need x-rays?
• Is there an alternative to the approach you’re recommending?
• What can I do at home to keep my gums and teeth healthy?
• Do you recommend a particular toothbrush or toothpaste?
• Do you recommend using mouthwash?
• Can I gargle with salt water or should I use a stronger antibacterial mouthwash?
• Are there any restrictions that you would suggest?

Don’t hesitate to ask other questions during your appointment.

Remember to make a note of your symptoms. Note when your symptoms come and go and how long they last. You might be stressed before a dental appointment and if you are in pain as well you might not remember all the things you want to ask. Write them down and take them with you to your appointment.

Dentures Concluded

Post by: Gerarda on 10 Feb 2020

Today´s blog, is part 6 of a 6-part series.

What type of denture is best for me?
You and your dentist will decide which type of denture is best for you, but your dental requirements may necessitate a particular type. An example of this is if you have all your teeth removed, then you would not be able to have a partial or an overdenture (removable dental prosthesis that covers and rests on one or more remaining natural teeth, the roots of natural teeth, and/or dental implants).

Only a dentist who is highly qualified in dentures can help you decide which type of denture is best for you.

Conclusion
Teeth are a significant component to retaining the shape of your face. Without the support of teeth the mouth collapses and one experiences sagging of the facial skin. Dentures provide your jaw the height to restore your face to its normal position. Whether you choose fixed or removable dentures it is important to know that there are many options available, traditional/full, partial, custom, immediate, snap-in, overdenture, upper, lower or economy to name a few.

Consult a dentist who is skilled in dentures and together decide the best option for you based on whether some or all of your teeth need to be replaced and the cost involved.

Successful People

Post by: Gerarda on 25 Jun 2015

Group of young multi ethnic people holding word success

Think of success and the name Zig Ziglar comes to mind. He was an expert on success, and in his book, Born to Win! Find Your Success Code, he shared the philosophy that brought him that success. It is really very simple. He suggested that you have a plan and plan to succeed. In his book he provided the strategies to do just that. But what is success?

Below, he shares a short list of the characteristics that he believed comprise success:

What Success Is:

1. Success is knowing that you did a great job when you close the door to your office at the end of each workday and head for home.

2. Success is having a home and people to love who love you in return.

3. Success is having the financial security to meet your obligations each month and the knowledge that you have provided that security for your family in the event of your demise.

4. Success is having the kind of faith that lets you know where to turn when there seems to be no place to turn.

5. Success is having an interest or hobby that gives you joy and peace.

6. Success is knowing who you are.

7. Success is taking good care of you and waking up healthy each day.

8. Success is slipping under the covers at the end of the day and realizing with gratitude that, “It just doesn’t get much better than this!”

Success means different things to different people as you can see from this list. It also involves more than one area of your life. It involves the whole person. Focus only on one area and you will limit your success.

 

Categories: Costa del Sol News,General Health,Stockholm Dental Clinic News,Uncategorized
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Posted on Thursday 25th June 2015 at 8:00 am