If You Only Brush Once a Day

Post by: Gerarda on 05 Jul 2022

Maintaining good oral hygiene takes among other things, regularly brushing your teeth. Tell me something I don´t know, you may say.

Dental associations around the world recommend brushing your teeth twice a day, for two minutes each time. That means brush after breakfast for two minutes and again at night for another two minutes. That is a whopping four minutes out of your day and yet not everyone follows this recommendation. More people than you might think actually go through the day only brushing once. While that is better than not brushing at all which is essentially 2% of the population, it actually increases your chances of incurring costly dental treatment later on.

Brushing your teeth twice a day as is suggested by dental professionals has a few advantages, it saves the embarrassment of having bad breath and stained teeth.

By brushing only once a day:

1. Cavities are almost a certainty and that increases your risk by 33%. When you brush your teeth, it helps to remove food particles and the sticky substance containing bacteria that forms on your teeth called plaque. This bacteria-containing plaque produces acid which attack tooth enamel and if not removed causes cavities.

2. Increases your chance of getting gum disease – only brushing once every 24 hours creates a feast for the existing bacteria in your mouth. The plaque that isn’t removed hardens and becomes tartar which makes it harder to keep the teeth clean. Tartar build-up on your gums leads to inflammation and bleeding gums that causes gum disease. This is also known as periodontal disease.

3. Can lead to more dental treatment. Needing a one-off filling is one thing and can happen to the best of us, but brushing only once a day almost guarantees more fillings and bigger fillings. Sometimes the tooth is decayed to the point of needing root canal treatment or a crown. Those costs can be avoided by adding another two minutes a day to your brushing routine.

One of the best ways to care for your teeth and gums is simple. Regular brushing. And that means twice a day. After meals.

Adding flossing to your routine is also beneficial, but that is for another day.

 

To Floss or Not To Floss

Post by: Gerarda on 23 Feb 2022

A common question we hear at Stockholm Dental is, “Do I really need to floss, or is brushing enough?” Unlike many things in life, flossing isn’t a mere suggestion; it’s actually an integral part of good oral hygiene, therefore, an indispensable part of your daily routine.

The purpose of flossing is to remove plaque and food particles from tight spaces between your teeth and hard to reach places. Flossing helps to keep your gums protected from bacteria which can cause periodontal disease. Flossing also keeps your teeth free of decay and your smile white.

The purpose of daily flossing is not only to promote healthy teeth, it further contributes to your health in other ways. There is increasing evidence linking periodontal disease to an increased risk of heart disease and an increase of inflammatory substances in the blood. (See blog post Jan 11, 2022)

Teeth brushing alone may not protect you from gum disease and subsequent tooth loss in extreme cases; however, adding flossing to your daily routine helps improve the health of your gums which in turn prevents gums from bleeding and feeding bacteria which causes tooth decay.

The American Dental Association has recommended flossing since 1908 and that recommendation hasn’t changed. Make the most of your oral care routine.

Don’t skip the flossing.

Link Between Gum Disease and Systemic Conditions

Post by: Gerarda on 11 Jan 2022

Many of the patients who sit in our chair suffer from some form of gum disease. Some of those patients may also have an increased risk for developing, or may already have a systemic condition. A systemic condition is one that affects the entire body and not just a particular organ or body part. For example, systemic conditions can be high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, kidney disease, anemia or bleeding disorders to name a few. Most likely patients are unaware that there is a link between gum disease and systemic conditions and this article will address this.

Gum disease is prevalent among many adult patients. The World Health Organization Europe (WHO) has found that severe periodontal (gum) disease can be found in 5–20% of middle-aged (35–44 years) adults and up to 40% of older individuals (65–74 years). Gum disease is also a major contributor to the loss of natural teeth. The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) estimates that in the U.S. approx. 47% of adults over 30 years old have gum disease, as well as 70% of adults over the age of 65. It is not just a European phenomenon.

For more than 20 years, the U.S. Surgeon General has recognized the link between periodontal disease and other systemic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, stroke, and diabetes; additionally, it found an increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Research conducted by The American Dental Association (ADA) likewise found a link between gum disease and serious systemic health conditions. They say their data is clear and suggests two possible explanations1:

  1. Chronic inflammation in the oral cavity could increase bloodstream inflammatory markers that affect the patient’s immune response or increase the patient’s burden of inflammation.
  2. The oral cavity collects pathogenic bacteria that infiltrate the bloodstream and affect other parts of the body or systemic pathologies.

The American Dental Association (ADA) also suggests that gum disease and other conditions share common factors such as poor diet and smoking that increase the risk for disease. To date though no research has provided a direct link to the cause between gum disease and systemic health conditions. Neither have they proven that if a person receives treatment for gum disease that it will avert any health condition or prevent any progression of systemic conditions.2

The importance of good oral hygiene at home cannot be understated, but in conjunction with ending your smoking habit, exercising on a daily basis along with a balanced diet. This will not only keep your teeth healthy, but could have a major impact on your body as a whole.

 

References

  1. Eke PI, Dye BA, Wei L, Thornton-Evans GO, Genco RJ. Prevalence of periodontitis in adults in the United States: 2009 and 2010. J Dent Res. 2012;91(10):914 -920. doi:10.1177/00220345124573732.
  2. Oral-systemic health. American Dental Association. September 23, 2019. Accessed January 3, 2022. https://www.ada.org/resources/research/science-and-research-institute/oral-health-topics/oral-systemic-health

Halitosis – Bad Breath

Post by: Gerarda on 20 Jul 2020

Overview

Depending on the condition of your health, various foods you eat, and level of oral hygiene, you can suffer from halitosis or bad breath. This condition can be embarrassing especially when it is particularly foul smelling. You don´t want to be in the position where someone smells your breath before they are close to you. Embarrassing indeed! Sometimes simply improving your oral hygiene and being consistent with it can improve the problem.

Sure there are countless products that are designed to fight bad breath, such as mouthwash, mints and gum, but they are only a temporary solution and don´t address the cause of the problem.

Things to do before you see your dentist:
• Brush after eating
• Brush your tongue
• Floss after brushing
• Drink plenty of water
• If that doesn’t work then make an appointment to see your dentist
• If your dentist decides that your teeth are not causing the bad breath, then make an appointment with your medical doctor to ensure it is not something more serious

Symptoms

There are those who worry too much about their breath and have no problem and those who have bad breath and don´t know it. A simple test is to blow your breath into a cupped hand and smell it or ask someone close to you to smell your breath. You better know this person well because it is not the nicest request.

When To See A Doctor

If you realize you have bad breath, then look at your oral hygiene. See what you need to change in your lifestyle. Maybe you need to brush your teeth if you don´t already, or maybe you need to brush more often.

Look at when you brush your teeth. If you brush them before breakfast and before you go to bed at night then you need to change your routine and brush after breakfast. If you only brush before breakfast then particles of food sit in the mouth and between teeth until you brush and floss again. Bacteria are feeding between brushing and that is when things happen. Sulfur is produced by food particles left in the mouth and then you end up with bad breath or halitosis.

If you have good oral hygiene and still have bad breath then see your medical doctor.

Making simple changes to your oral hygiene routine can make a big difference. It will also be cheaper on the wallet.

Alternatives to Dentures

Post by: Gerarda on 30 Jan 2020

Today´s blog, is part 5 of a 6-part series.

What are the alternatives to dentures?
One alternative is an implant supported denture which allows you to have a permanently fixed denture. This eliminates one of the concerns most people have about conventional full dentures, that they will lose the denture when eating or while out in public. Prior to the introduction of osseointegrated implants (when the implant has fully healed into the bone) a conventional complete removable denture was the only treatment option available for completely edentulous patients. A denture supported on implants or a bridge are alternatives.

An implant-supported denture uses between 4-6 implants in a jaw. The denture uses the strength of the dental implants to support and retain a full set of false teeth. The denture is fixed permanently in place and the pressure from eating is transmitted to the implants rather than the gums, therefore, you have the safety and security that it will not accidentally come out as your dentist is the only one who can take it out.

Another alternative to a denture is a bridge. A bridge replaces missing teeth by placing two or more specially fitted crowns on either side of the space formed by your missing tooth or teeth. A false tooth or pontic is attached to fill in the space of the missing tooth or teeth. As bridges are cemented in place, they are considered a “fixed or permanent denture.”

What are the benefits of implants?
The obvious benefit of having an implant-supported denture is the security one feels that it will not come out unexpectedly. The denture is anchored firmly in place so is stable in the mouth. There is no discomfort from friction with the gum and they are more hygienic as there is less surface contact with the gums. They also allow you to eat normally and taste your food as there is no acrylic blocking your taste buds.