Halitosis – Bad Breath

Post by: Gerarda on 20 Jul 2020

Overview

Depending on the condition of your health, various foods you eat, and level of oral hygiene, you can suffer from halitosis or bad breath. This condition can be embarrassing especially when it is particularly foul smelling. You don´t want to be in the position where someone smells your breath before they are close to you. Embarrassing indeed! Sometimes simply improving your oral hygiene and being consistent with it can improve the problem.

Sure there are countless products that are designed to fight bad breath, such as mouthwash, mints and gum, but they are only a temporary solution and don´t address the cause of the problem.

Things to do before you see your dentist:
• Brush after eating
• Brush your tongue
• Floss after brushing
• Drink plenty of water
• If that doesn’t work then make an appointment to see your dentist
• If your dentist decides that your teeth are not causing the bad breath, then make an appointment with your medical doctor to ensure it is not something more serious

Symptoms

There are those who worry too much about their breath and have no problem and those who have bad breath and don´t know it. A simple test is to blow your breath into a cupped hand and smell it or ask someone close to you to smell your breath. You better know this person well because it is not the nicest request.

When To See A Doctor

If you realize you have bad breath, then look at your oral hygiene. See what you need to change in your lifestyle. Maybe you need to brush your teeth if you don´t already, or maybe you need to brush more often.

Look at when you brush your teeth. If you brush them before breakfast and before you go to bed at night then you need to change your routine and brush after breakfast. If you only brush before breakfast then particles of food sit in the mouth and between teeth until you brush and floss again. Bacteria are feeding between brushing and that is when things happen. Sulfur is produced by food particles left in the mouth and then you end up with bad breath or halitosis.

If you have good oral hygiene and still have bad breath then see your medical doctor.

Making simple changes to your oral hygiene routine can make a big difference. It will also be cheaper on the wallet.

Alternatives to Dentures

Post by: Gerarda on 30 Jan 2020

Today´s blog, is part 5 of a 6-part series.

What are the alternatives to dentures?
One alternative is an implant supported denture which allows you to have a permanently fixed denture. This eliminates one of the concerns most people have about conventional full dentures, that they will lose the denture when eating or while out in public. Prior to the introduction of osseointegrated implants (when the implant has fully healed into the bone) a conventional complete removable denture was the only treatment option available for completely edentulous patients. A denture supported on implants or a bridge are alternatives.

An implant-supported denture uses between 4-6 implants in a jaw. The denture uses the strength of the dental implants to support and retain a full set of false teeth. The denture is fixed permanently in place and the pressure from eating is transmitted to the implants rather than the gums, therefore, you have the safety and security that it will not accidentally come out as your dentist is the only one who can take it out.

Another alternative to a denture is a bridge. A bridge replaces missing teeth by placing two or more specially fitted crowns on either side of the space formed by your missing tooth or teeth. A false tooth or pontic is attached to fill in the space of the missing tooth or teeth. As bridges are cemented in place, they are considered a “fixed or permanent denture.”

What are the benefits of implants?
The obvious benefit of having an implant-supported denture is the security one feels that it will not come out unexpectedly. The denture is anchored firmly in place so is stable in the mouth. There is no discomfort from friction with the gum and they are more hygienic as there is less surface contact with the gums. They also allow you to eat normally and taste your food as there is no acrylic blocking your taste buds.

 

Which toothbrush is most effective?

Post by: Gerarda on 27 May 2019

The correct answer is either a manual toothbrush or an electric toothbrush is most effective as long as you know how to use it.

As children, many of us were taught to brush up and down or side to side. If you use a manual toothbrush you need to brush in an elliptical fashion so you don’t put excessive pressure on the gums and erode them over time. You become the mover and the shaker of your brush. If you have difficulty brushing, perhaps an electric one is right for you.

With an electric toothbrush, the brush provides the movement while you become the guide; therefore, the brushing technique is slightly different than using a conventional brush. Read the inclosed manual for the brand you buy. Use an electric brush that has a round head.

Whichever type you decide to buy, make sure you use a toothbrush that has soft bristles. If you need to brush up on your technique, ask your dental professional for a “how to” session. Remember to brush for 2 minutes, which means 30 seconds for each quadrant.

 

6 Reasons Why Brushing Your Teeth is Essential

Post by: Gerarda on 21 May 2019

  1. Prevents Gum Disease – While poor oral hygiene, no regular trips to your dentist and genetics play a role in gum disease, so does non-existent brushing or insufficient brushing. If you´ve had a meal or a snack and have not brushed or flossed or at least rinsed your mouth then there will be leftover food deposits in your mouth. As a consequence those food deposits encourage bacteria which harden and become plaque. This can be seen as a white or yellowish substance at the gum line or between the teeth. The bacteria in the plaque irritates the gums and causes inflammation and the gums bleed when you brush. This is also known as gingivitis and is the first stage of gum disease. The solution? Brush at least two or three times a day (three is ideal) to prevent plaque building up in the first place. And floss.
  2. Removes Stains on Teeth   The best way to do that is to have a good toothbrush and gentle toothpaste that you use at least twice a day. A soft toothbrush to be exact. For stains from coffee, red wine, ketchup and other teeth staining foods your toothbrush is your best defence.
  3. Maintains Fresh Breath As the remains of your meal accumulate, subsequent bacteria in the mouth are going to accumulate as well. This results in bad breath or halitosis. To prevent bacteria from building up, brush your teeth regularly, at least twice a day. If you cannot brush after eating then rinse your mouth to help prevent food from becoming trapped between teeth.
  4. Reduces Chance of Major Illnesses – Just as a prolonged plaque build-up on teeth causes gum disease, a plaque build-up in the arteries causes a heart attack or stroke. Are they the same plaque? No, but according to the Mayo Clinic there may be a link between infected gums (gingivitis) and infected heart tissue (endocarditis). Nevertheless, as researchers do not until now understand the link, just that there is one, it is best to play it safe and treat one condition knowing that it may benefit you in treating another.
  5. Pregnancy – Changes in hormones cause greater gum sensitivity, therefore, pregnant women are more susceptible to gingivitis.
  6. Saves Money – If you ever wonder if you are brushing your teeth correctly, have your dentist explain the proper brushing technique. Being proactive by brushing and visiting your dentist regularly can result in having lower dental bills as your dentist knows what is happening in your mouth and will inform you of any changes.
Categories: Dental health,Dental Information,Gum Disease
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Posted on Tuesday 21st May 2019 at 9:07 am

oldman

The study wanted to determine if periodontitis played a role in dementia severity and progression.

A new study jointly led by the University of Southampton and King’s College London has found a link between gum disease and greater rates of cognitive decline in people with early stages of Alzheimer’s disease.

Periodontitis or gum disease is common in older people and may become more common in Alzheimer’s disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Higher levels of antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increase in levels of inflammatory molecules elsewhere in the body, which in turn has been linked to greater rates of cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease in previous studies.

The latest study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, set out to determine whether periodontitis or gum disease is associated with increased dementia severity and subsequent greater progression of cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer’s disease.

In the observational study, 59 participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample was taken to measure inflammatory markers in their blood. A dental hygienist who was blind to cognitive outcomes assessed participants’ dental health. The majority of participants (52) were followed-up at six months when all assessments were repeated.

The presence of gum disease at baseline was associated with a six-fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline in participants over the six-month follow-up period of the study. Periodontitis at baseline was also associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six-month follow-up period. The authors conclude that gum disease is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease, possibly via mechanisms linked to the body’s inflammatory response.

Limitations of the study included the small number of participants; the authors advise that the study should be replicated ideally with a larger cohort. The precise mechanisms by which gum disease may be linked to cognitive decline are not fully clear and other factors might also play a part in the decline seen in participants’ cognition alongside their oral health.

However, growing evidence from a number of studies links the body’s inflammatory response to increased rates of cognitive decline, suggesting that it would be worth exploring whether the treatment of gum disease might also benefit the treatment of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

Professor Clive Holmes, senior author from the University of Southampton, says: “These are very interesting results which build on previous work we have done that shows that chronic inflammatory conditions have a detrimental effect on disease progression in people with Alzheimer’s disease. Our study was small and lasted for six months so further trials need to be carried out to develop these results. However, if there is a direct relationship between periodontitis and cognitive decline, as this current study suggests, then treatment of gum disease might be a possible treatment option for Alzheimer’s.”

Dr. Mark Ide, first author from the Dental Institute at King’s College London says: “Gum disease is widespread in the UK and US, and in older age groups is thought to be a major cause of tooth loss. In the UK in 2009, around 80 percent of adults over 55 had evidence of gum disease, whilst 40 percent of adults aged over 65-74 (and 60 percent of those aged over 75) had less than 21 of their original 32 teeth, with half of them reporting gum disease before they lost teeth.

“A number of studies have shown that having few teeth, possibly as a consequence of earlier gum disease, is associated with a greater risk of developing dementia. We also believe, based on various research findings, that the presence of teeth with active gum disease results in higher body-wide levels of the sorts of inflammatory molecules which have also been associated with an elevated risk of other outcomes such as cognitive decline or cardiovascular disease. Research has suggested that effective gum treatment can reduce the levels of these molecules closer to that seen in a healthy state.

“Previous studies have also shown that patients with Alzheimer’s disease have poorer dental health than others of similar age and that the more severe the dementia the worse the dental health, most likely reflecting greater difficulties with taking care of oneself as dementia becomes more severe.”

The full study, “Periodontitis and cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease,” was published in PLOS ONE. This research in its present form was reprinted from Dental Products Report.
Categories: Dental health,Dental Information,Gum Disease
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Posted on Tuesday 12th April 2016 at 8:39 am