National Dentist´s Day

Post by: Gerarda on 06 Mar 2020

March 6th every year we show appreciation to dentists all over the world who keep our pearly whites in tip top shape. This day is also a way to bring awareness to dentistry so that people can learn how best to care for their teeth. It is also a reminder for those who have neglected their teeth or avoid going to a dentist to schedule a checkup.

Nothing makes a dentist happier then when a patient arrives and it is obvious they have good oral hygiene as they brush and floss regularly.

What the patient can do:
1. Decide on an oral health routine. Include both brushing and flossing and remember to floss after you have brushed.
2. Book that dental checkup you have been putting off. Ask your dentist to show you have to brush your teeth so you are not wearing away enamel.
3. If you have children, brush their teeth until they are mature enough to do it for themselves. Once you have brushed your child´s teeth, give them the brush so they feel they are doing it as well.
4. Smile and show off those pearly whites. It shows the job you do and that of your dentist.
5. Take a picture of those beautiful teeth and post it on your social media accounts.

Tips for a healthy dental routine:
1. Brush at least twice a day for at least 2 minutes.
2. Brush gently using elliptical strokes.
3. Use a soft toothbrush.
4. Brush after eating.
5. Floss after brushing.
6. See your dentist twice a year or as your dentist recommends.
7. Eat a balanced diet and limit eating and drinking between meals.
8. Limit the amount of citrus you eat and drink.

A visit to a dentist is a scary proposition for many people. Remember though, dentistry has come a long way from when Dr. John M. Harris started the world’s first dental school in
Bainbridge, Ohio in 1828.

Evolving dental technology and education are two of the things that make a visit to a dentist much more pleasant than in earlier days. That being said nothing beats a dentist who has the hands of a sculptor, the precision of an engineer, the eye of an artist and the experience to combine all of these professions to carry out either a simple or a challenging treatment and still make the result look natural.

That is in essence Dr. Mikael G. Kahn or as he is so affectionately known, Mikael.

Dental Health in Intensive Care

Post by: Gerarda on 16 Aug 2015

Dental Hygiene

Patients with compromised health in the intensive care unit were at a lower risk for respiratory infections if they received proper dental care.

New research shows vulnerable patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) who received enhanced oral care from a dentist were at significantly less risk for developing a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), like ventilator-associated pneumonia, during their stay in the hospital.

The study was published in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA).

“Bacteria causing healthcare-associated infections often start in the oral cavity,” said Fernando Bellissimo-Rodrigues, MD, lead author of the study. “This study suggests that having a dentist provide weekly care as part the ICU team may improve outcomes for vulnerable patients in this setting.”

Brazilian researchers utilized an observer-blind randomized clinical trial design to analyze data from 254 adult patients who stayed in a general ICU for at least 48 hours. Patients were randomized to receive enhanced dental care provided by a dentist, or to receive routine oral hygiene performed by the ICU nurse staff.

Enhanced dental care included teeth brushing, tongue scraping, removal of calculus, atraumatic restorative treatment of caries, tooth extraction and topical application of chlorhexidine corresponding to each patients’ needs four to five times a week. Comparatively, regular treatment consisted of mechanical cleansing using gauze followed by topical application of chlorhexidine three times a day.

Patients provided enhanced dental care were 56 percent less likely to develop a respiratory tract infection during their ICU stay compared to the control patient group. Researchers note that enhanced dental treatment, including oral antisepsis routinely performed in ICUs could be more effective in reducing the oral bacteria and help prevent migration of these bacteria into the lungs.

This post is reprinted from materials provided by Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. 

Categories: Dental health,Dental Information,Stockholm Dental Clinic News
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Posted on Sunday 16th August 2015 at 2:52 pm

Dental Examination

Post by: Gerarda on 20 May 2014

The importance of a dental examination cannot be understated as it is an integral part of preventive dental health care. Many dentists suggest that it is necessary to have one every 6 months but our dentist, Dr. Mikael Kahn, recommends having a dental check-up once a year, provided that you maintain good oral hygiene, meaning that you brush and floss daily. In many cases the dental examination is combined with scaling & polishing (dental cleaning).

During the dental examination Dr. Kahn will take digital x-rays, especially if it is the first time he sees a patient. Normally, two x-rays are taken on each side. If on the other hand it is an adult patient who comes regularly, x-rays might be taken  every second or even every third year, depending on the oral health of the patient. Dental x-rays are necessary to see the bone level and to be able to see whether there is any tooth decay (caries) between the teeth further back in the mouth. In the front region, a dentist can normally find caries between teeth without any dental x-rays. Appointment for the Dentist

Dr. Mikael Kahn will check your occlusion (how the upper & lower teeth fit together when you close your mouth), your TMJ (the joint which sits immediately in front of your ear) for stability or any clicking sounds and check your mouth as a whole for any abnormalities.

If you have questions about your oral health, your examination is a good time to ask.  Many patients use that time to ask about cosmetic procedures – they want new crowns or a bridge, or they might want dental implants, and therefore, want to know whether they are a good candidate for implant treatment. This is also a good time to share with Dr. Kahn if you are anxious about dental treatment as a whole or any specific part of dental treatment, so adjustments can be made appropriately.

Even if you are partially edentulous, or no longer have teeth, it is still important to have a consultation with your dentist to maintain good oral health and have your prosthesis assessed to see that they still fit well, in order to preserve the bone for as long as possible.

Once Dr. Kahn has assessed your oral health, he will discuss it with you and let you know if you have any caries (tooth decay), gingivitis or gum disease (bone loss) or any other oral health issue, and give you suggestions for what needs to be done. If you are at risk then you may need more frequent check-ups, otherwise, he will see you in a year.

Extend Your Life Span By Flossing Your Teeth

Post by: Stockholm Dental Clinic on 25 Jan 2013

Christmas is a memory and New Year´s resolutions are fast diminishing their importance as 2013 sees the near end of its first month. Many of our good intentions are quickly flying out the window as time slips by as if it were collecting triple air miles on some exclusive airline. Where is January going? And why is it travelling so quickly?

If one of those resolutions you made with very good intentions was to floss daily, then that is one resolution to keep. If though, you seem to be finding every excuse under the sun not to floss, then I am sure we have heard them all and we can also give you a way around them all.

Do you say that your gums bleed when they floss? Chances are you have gingivitis, something for which you really need to be flossing, or maybe you have the floss too long and it is snapping between the teeth instead of you guiding it with a shorter piece. If you say that the floss shreds when you floss perhaps you have a broken tooth or you have an ill fitting crown. Then you need to see your dentist. If you feel you don´t have time to floss then think of it as part of your daily hygiene. You wash your face and brush your teeth before getting into bed, then add an extra 1-2 min for flossing. What will you do with the 1-2 min you saved otherwise? If you don´t think that food gets between your teeth then you are mistaken, unless your teeth are so spaced that you can see between them. As your tooth brush doesn’t get between the teeth then you need to floss. The micro particles left after eating and drinking need to be flossed away as otherwise they become plaque. Plaque is what causes tooth decay over time, or inflamed gums or periodontal disease.

There are a host of other excuses people use for not flossing, but if research from the prestigious Emory University is to be believed then, “Periodontal disease is a serious health problem that is not just isolated to the mouth and gums,” says Dr. Steven M. Roser. “It can become a portal for infection to enter the body and cause other serious health problems such as heart disease and diabetes. It has also been proven to affect pregnancy, increasing the risk of low birth weight similar to that of smoking.” And if that is still not enough then, Michael F. Roizen MD states in his book “New Age” that “flossing can add 6.4 years to your life”.

Now what do you think of that extra minute?

Categories: Dental Information
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Posted on Friday 25th January 2013 at 12:40 pm