13 Most Acidic Fruit

Post by: Gerarda on 21 Nov 2022

Tooth enamel is the outer layer of a tooth and is hard, shiny and white. While it is the hardest substance in the body, even stronger than bone, it is still fragile. Enamel is just a thin layer of minerals that cover the tissue inside the tooth, therefore, it needs proper care.

When enamel, that first layer of defense is worn away from a tooth, it exposes the underlying dentin that is yellowish in color. This is called enamel erosion. This erosion can cause tooth sensitivity, pain, discoloration, indentations in teeth and fractured teeth.

There are many causes of erosion in teeth, but the main culprits of erosion are acidic foods, drinks and bodily fluids – saliva. As teeth enamel erodes it becomes thinner which allows the yellower dentin that lies below the enamel to be more visible through the enamel.

You can stop further damage if it hasn´t already broken through to the layer of dentin by eliminating the foods that caused the erosion in the first place. Even though tooth enamel is very strong, as it doesn´t have any living cells, it is unable to repair itself once it is damaged so you may need tooth bonding or for more severe erosion, a crown or a veneer.

There are many causes of tooth erosion, but as fruit is consumed in such high amounts on a daily basis, below are the 13 most acidic fruits.

  • Lemon Juice
  • Limes
  • Blue Plums
  • Grapes
  • Pomegranates
  • Grapefruits
  • Blueberries
  • Pineapples
  • Apples
  • Peaches
  • Apricots
  • Oranges
  • Tomatoes

Prevent Enamel Erosion

  • Eat cheese after eating fruit as it raises the pH levels in your mouth and increases saliva production.
  • Avoid sucking on lemons or any highly acidic fruit.
  • Use a straw when drinking fruit juices as it keeps the juice from coming in contact with your teeth.
  • Rinse your mouth with water after eating fruit to dilute the acids and wait for 30 minutes to brush to give the dentin time to resettle.
  • Brush with fluoride toothpaste.

Visit your dentist regularly to discuss ways to maintain a healthy smile. Practice good oral hygiene.

Categories: Tooth enamel,Tooth erosion
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Posted on Monday 21st November 2022 at 3:47 pm

8 Oral Hygiene Tips & Best Practices

Post by: Gerarda on 01 Jun 2022

1. Brush your teeth at least twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste for two minutes at a time. Use a very soft-bristled toothbrush and replace it every three to four months. We suggest to change your toothbrush with each new season. It is an easy way of remembering when you last changed it.

2. Floss daily to remove plaque and debris from between your teeth and along the gumline.

3. Use an antiseptic mouthwash to help kill bacteria and freshen your breath.

4. Limit sugary and acidic foods and drinks, which can contribute to tooth decay and erosion.

5. Don’t smoke or use other tobacco products, as they increase your risk of oral cancer and other health problems.

6. Visit your dentist and dental hygienist regularly for dental check-ups / dental examinations and cleanings. It’s important to have a professional cleaning to remove tartar and plaque that can’t be removed by regular brushing and flossing.

7. Wear a mouthguard if you play sports or grind your teeth at night.

8. Consider using dental products such as water picks or interproximal brushes to help reach and clean hard-to-reach areas.

It’s important to remember that maintaining good oral hygiene is a lifelong commitment that requires daily care and regular dental check-ups.

 

Pregnancy and Dental Care

Post by: Gerarda on 01 Jul 2021

 

During pregnancy, it is important for women to maintain good oral hygiene and to schedule regular dental check-ups / dental examinations.

Pregnancy can cause changes in the mouth, such as an increase in plaque and gingivitis, due to hormonal changes. This can lead to an increased risk of tooth decay and periodontal disease. Additionally, pregnancy can also cause morning sickness, which can lead to increased acid in the mouth and tooth erosion.

It is important for pregnant women to brush and floss regularly, as well as to use fluoride toothpaste and mouthwash. They should also avoid sugary and acidic foods and drinks.

It is generally safe for pregnant women to receive routine dental treatment, but it is important to let the dentist know that you are pregnant, so they can take the necessary precautions.

If you are planning on getting pregnant, schedule a dental appointment as you would a medical appointment to ensure that you have good oral health as well as good general health.

Tooth Enamel Erosion and How to Prevent it

Post by: Gerarda on 19 Apr 2021

Even though you have the body’s hardest tissue covering your teeth, enamel, it is still very susceptible to damage especially from crunching or grinding hard substances, consuming acidic drinks, or chipping from opening a bottle with your teeth or biting your fingernails.

Enamel covers the crown of a tooth and is the only part visible outside the gum. Enamel serves a function of protection, providing a layer of insulation against temperatures and chemicals. If you have a tooth that has eroded you can have sensitivity for hot or cold when eating and drinking. Breathing cold air or eating sweets can also give you that same sensitivity. Once the tooth has eroded it leaves openings for the sensitivity to get through to the layer of tooth that contains the nerve fibers.

What causes tooth enamel erosion?
Eating too much food or drink containing sugar and acids erodes the enamel on teeth. Normal bacteria in your mouth thrive on sugar and unless you maintain good oral hygiene, bacteria are left to feed on the sugar which wreaks havoc on your teeth.

Tooth enamel erosion can be caused by the following:
• Soft drinks & fruit drinks
• Sour foods or candies – any food that tastes sour indicates the presence of an acid
• Foods high in sugar and starches – bread, pasta, rice, couscous, potatoes, breakfast cereals, oats and other grains
• Bulimia or alcoholism – frequent vomiting can erode the tooth enamel
• Dry mouth or low saliva flow (xerostomia)
• Environmental conditions – grinding (bruxism), wear and tear, stress
• Abrasion – brushing your teeth too hard or using a hard toothbrush
• Acid reflux disease (GERD) or heartburn
• Gastrointestinal problems
• Medications (antihistamines, aspirin, vitamin C)

How to avoid tooth erosion?
• Limit the amount of acidic food and drink you consume. If you are having a soft drink or fruit juice then have a glass of water or milk after to rinse your mouth or eat a piece of cheese.
• Drink water throughout the day.
• Use a soft toothbrush.
• Use fluoride toothpaste.
• Get treatment for any health conditions.
• Ask your dentist about sealants or dental bonding to prevent tooth erosion.

What to do if I have tooth erosion?
The tooth needs treatment in the form of tooth bonding or depending on the amount of tooth substance lost, it may need a veneer or a crown to protect it from further damage.

The Bitter Truth of Lemons

Post by: Gerarda on 01 Feb 2021

The biggest delinquent in tooth erosion (loss of tooth enamel) is acidic drinks. People are constantly being told that drinking the juice of a lemon the first thing in the morning is a great detox for the liver or the gastrointestinal tract. What you are not told is the fact that lemon is a highly acidic food. While lemon might be good for your digestive system and a good source for Vitamin C it is not good for your teeth.

If you must drink lemon juice, drink it with 250ml of warm water (not hot) to lessen the acidity. After drinking the lemon water, rinse your mouth with water immediately. This removes any acid that may remain on the tooth surface and reduces the acidity of your saliva.

DO NOT brush your teeth for at least 30 minutes after drinking the lemon water.

Use a soft toothbrush with a fluoride toothpaste (fluoride strengthens tooth enamel) and brush gently. The acid in the juice softens tooth enamel and makes it more prone to erosion during brushing.