Dental Appointment

Post by: Gerarda on 19 Feb 2020

What You Can Do To Prepare

Sometimes it seems that by the time you arrive at your dental appointment the problem has disappeared and then you have forgotten the symptoms you had. Most problems in dentistry do not go away permanently, the symptoms may stop for a while, but they usually come back. So it is beneficial to keep that appointment and not cancel it. To help you get ready for a dental appointment, make a list of:

• Any symptoms you’re experiencing, including any that may seem unrelated to the reason for your appointment
• Important personal information, such as any medical conditions
• Medications you take, including vitamins or other supplements
• Questions to ask your dentist to take full advantage of your time together

Some questions to ask your dentist depending on your issue may include:

• Do you think, for example, gingivitis, caries or an abscess is causing my symptoms?
• Do I need x-rays?
• Is there an alternative to the approach you’re recommending?
• What can I do at home to keep my gums and teeth healthy?
• Do you recommend a particular toothbrush or toothpaste?
• Do you recommend using mouthwash?
• Can I gargle with salt water or should I use a stronger antibacterial mouthwash?
• Are there any restrictions that you would suggest?

Don’t hesitate to ask other questions during your appointment.

Remember to make a note of your symptoms. Note when your symptoms come and go and how long they last. You might be stressed before a dental appointment and if you are in pain as well you might not remember all the things you want to ask. Write them down and take them with you to your appointment.

Extend Your Life Span By Flossing Your Teeth

Post by: Stockholm Dental Clinic on 25 Jan 2013

Christmas is a memory and New Year´s resolutions are fast diminishing their importance as 2013 sees the near end of its first month. Many of our good intentions are quickly flying out the window as time slips by as if it were collecting triple air miles on some exclusive airline. Where is January going? And why is it travelling so quickly?

If one of those resolutions you made with very good intentions was to floss daily, then that is one resolution to keep. If though, you seem to be finding every excuse under the sun not to floss, then I am sure we have heard them all and we can also give you a way around them all.

Do you say that your gums bleed when they floss? Chances are you have gingivitis, something for which you really need to be flossing, or maybe you have the floss too long and it is snapping between the teeth instead of you guiding it with a shorter piece. If you say that the floss shreds when you floss perhaps you have a broken tooth or you have an ill fitting crown. Then you need to see your dentist. If you feel you don´t have time to floss then think of it as part of your daily hygiene. You wash your face and brush your teeth before getting into bed, then add an extra 1-2 min for flossing. What will you do with the 1-2 min you saved otherwise? If you don´t think that food gets between your teeth then you are mistaken, unless your teeth are so spaced that you can see between them. As your tooth brush doesn’t get between the teeth then you need to floss. The micro particles left after eating and drinking need to be flossed away as otherwise they become plaque. Plaque is what causes tooth decay over time, or inflamed gums or periodontal disease.

There are a host of other excuses people use for not flossing, but if research from the prestigious Emory University is to be believed then, “Periodontal disease is a serious health problem that is not just isolated to the mouth and gums,” says Dr. Steven M. Roser. “It can become a portal for infection to enter the body and cause other serious health problems such as heart disease and diabetes. It has also been proven to affect pregnancy, increasing the risk of low birth weight similar to that of smoking.” And if that is still not enough then, Michael F. Roizen MD states in his book “New Age” that “flossing can add 6.4 years to your life”.

Now what do you think of that extra minute?

Categories: Dental Information
Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted on Friday 25th January 2013 at 12:40 pm